The Glasgow district of Newlands originated as farmland situated in Cathcart Parish on the opposite side of the White Cart Water from Pollokshaws which was in Eastwood Parish. In the Ordnance Survey name books of 1856/57 the entry describes Newlands as "formerly a farm steading but now used as cot houses". The working farm buildings such as the stables, byre and dairy were situated at the "Mains of Newlands" described in the name books as "a good farm steading occupied by Mr Robert Deans & property of Sir John Maxwell".
The nearby burgh of Pollokshaws was a busy manufacturing town with no administrative connections with Newlands which was developed as an area of upmarket Victorian villas with large garden grounds.

1850's map showing old parish boundary and the former Newlands farmhouse  at corner of Newlands Road and Lubnaig Road

1850's map showing old parish boundary and former Newlands farmhouse at corner of Newlands Road and Lubnaig Road


A notice was published in the Glasgow Herald on 28th July 1820, offering the "Farm of Newlands and Merrylee" for let. The lands were owned at that time by Mr James Tassie, who could be contacted at Pollok.

1850's map showing old parish boundary and Newlands House at corner of Newlands Road and Lubnaig Road

Notice from Glasgow Herald, 28th July 1820, showing "Farm of Newlands and Merrylee"


Aerial view of site of former Newlands farmhouse

Aerial view of site of former Newlands farmhouse at corner of Newlands Road and Lubnaig Road


Postcard image of Newlands South Church

Postcard image of Newlands South Church


Hall at rear of Newlands South Church

Hall at rear of Newlands South Church

Newlands South Church originated in the hall to the rear which was designed by English architect Fred Rowntree for the United Presbyterian Church of Scotland.
The foundation stone was laid in September 1898 and the church was formally opened on 1st June, 1899.

Inscription at Newlands South Church Hall: Erected AD MDCCCXCIX (1899)

Inscription at Newlands South Church Hall: Erected AD MDCCCXCIX (1899)


The United Presbyterian Church merged with the Free Church in 1900 to become the United Free Church. Newlands United Free Church opened in 1903, designed in the Perpendicular Gothic style by Henry Edward Clifford. At the time of the church union in 1929 the building acquired its present title of Newlands South Church.

Newlands South Church

Newlands South Church


Reflection on main window at Newlands South Church

Reflection on main window at Newlands South Church


Frontage to Langside Drive of Newlands South Church

Frontage to Langside Drive of Newlands South Church


Early twentieth century view of Langside Drive, Newlands

Early twentieth century view of Langside Drive, Newlands


St Margaret's Episcopal Church, situated at the junction of Kilmarnock Road and Newlands Road, was designed in the Norman style by Peter MacGregor Chalmers and built in stages in the early twentieth century. The hall and vestries were completed in 1908, three years before work began on the main body of the church. The church was consecrated on Christmas Day 1928 and the tower added by 1935. The architect's original designs included a spire, which was never constructed.

Photograph of St. Margaret's Episcopal Church, Newlands, before the completion of the tower in 1935

Photograph of St. Margaret's Episcopal Church before the completion of the tower in 1935


Perspective drawing of St. Margaret's Episcopal Church, Newlands, Glasgow

Perspective drawing of St. Margaret's Episcopal Church with proposed tower, 1934


View of tower at St. Margaret's Church, Newlands

View of tower at St. Margaret's Church, Newlands


Shadows on St. Margaret's Church, Newlands

Shadows on St. Margaret's Church, Newlands


Altar at St. Margaret's Church, Newlands

Altar at St. Margaret's Church, Newlands


Dome over the altar at St. Margaret's Church depicting Christ the King

Dome over the altar at St. Margaret's Church depicting Christ the King


Interior view of St. Margaret's Church from the altar

Interior view of St. Margaret's Church from the altar


Dome over baptistry at Kilmarnock Road end of St. Margaret's Church

Dome over baptistry at Kilmarnock Road end of St. Margaret's Church


Font at baptistry  of St. Margaret's Church, Newlands

Font at baptistry of St. Margaret's Church, Newlands


No cars in sight in a tree-lined avenue in Newlands

No cars in sight in a tree-lined avenue in Newlands


Map showing Newlands House and Mains of Newlands in 1850's

Map showing Newlands House and Mains of Newlands in 1850's


View of Mains of Newlands looking west from Kilmarnock Road c.1830

View of Mains of Newlands looking west from Kilmarnock Road c.1830


The building in the background of the above picture is Auldhouse Mansion, situated south-west of Newlands. A detailed history of the mansion house is contained in the Pollokshaws & Auldhouse page of this website.

Victorian photograph of Auldhouse Mansion, Glasgow

Victorian photograph of Auldhouse Mansion, Glasgow


Detached villa in Newlands

Detached villa in Newlands


Double villa in St Bride's Road, Newlands

Inter-war double villa designed by Thomas Baird


Double villa in Arts & Crafts style, Newlands

Double villa in Arts & Crafts style, Newlands


Mock Tudor style villa in Newlands

Mock Tudor style villa in Newlands


Cottage style villa in Newlands

Cottage style villa in Newlands


The Beeches - Edwardian villa in Newlands

The Beeches - Edwardian villa in Newlands


Gatehouse at entrance to Newlands Park

Gatehouse at entrance to Newlands Park


Springtime in Newlands Park

Springtime in Newlands Park


Arbour and spring foliage in Newlands Park

Arbour and spring foliage in Newlands Park


Aerial view of Newlands

Aerial view of villas surrounding Newlands Park at Kilmarnock Road entrance


Winter in Newlands Park with frozen pond

Winter in Newlands Park with frozen pond and icy ground


Merrylee House in Briar Road was built in 1855 for Glasgow businessman Thomas Hill, the proprietor of Merrylee Wood which was described in the Ordnance Survey name book of 1856/ 1857 as "a wood situated on both sides of the road leading from Glasgow to Kilmarnock and near the Parish boundary".
Merrylee House had extensive gardens and greenhouses set aside for growing flowers, fruit and vegetables. In the 1860's & 1870's Alexander Walker, gardener to Thomas Hill of Merrylee, won numerous prizes for his flowers at the annual show of the Glasgow and West of Scotland Flower Society.
The adjacent Merrylee Farm was retained by Sir John Maxwell, who let it to various tenants over the years.

Merrylee House, Briar Road, Newlands

Merrylee House, Briar Road, Newlands

In 1921 the mansion house was acquired by an order of Fransiscan Sisters who expanded the site with a convent and school. Merrylee House and associated buildings were demolished in 1999 and the site redeveloped with modern housing that fits into the character of the area.


New houses on site of Merrylee House, Briar Road, Newlands

New houses on site of Merrylee House, Briar Road, Newlands


The southern extent of Merrylee Wood was marked by a little stream known as the "Merry Burn" which formed part of the boundary between the parishes of Cathcart and Eastwood. The burn now delineates the city boundary between Fernleigh Road, Newlands, Glasgow and Merryburn Avenue, Giffnock, East Renfrewshire. A more detailed description can be found in the Giffnock & Netherlee page of this website.

Map showing Merrylee House within Merrylee Wood, Newlands

Map showing Merrylee House within Merrylee Wood, Newlands


The bridge over the Merry Burn at the city boundary is distinguished with simplistic Art deco styling. The bank building shown on the photograph is on the Newlands / Glasgow side of the stream and exists today as a dental surgery.

Bank building at the bridge on Kilmarnock Road / Fenwick Road boundary

Bank building at the bridge on Kilmarnock Road at the city boundary


Bank building at the bridge on Kilmarnock Road / Fenwick Road boundary

View of Merry Burn from bridge at the city boundary


The former site of Merrylee Lodge nursing home was redeveloped in 2018 with the erection of 31 houses and a children's home. The houses were carefully designed to fit into the surrounding neighbourhood.

New housing at site of Merrylee Lodge, Newlands Road

New housing at site of Merrylee Lodge, Newlands Road


Merrylee Housing Scheme was a post-war development by Glasgow Corporation with an initial phase built 1951-1952. The terraced and semi-detached houses of the first stage had more in common with the city's inter-war council housing than the tenemental style adopted in the peripheral satellite schemes of the late 1950's.

Terraced houses in Muirskeith Road, Merrylee, built 1951

Terraced houses in Muirskeith Road, Merrylee, built 1951


Terraced houses in Muirskeith Road, Merrylee, 2019

Terraced houses in Muirskeith Road, Merrylee, 2019


Semi detached houses in Muirskeith Road, Merrylee, built 1951

2019 view of semi detached houses in Muirskeith Road, Merrylee, built 1951


As the decade progressed the house types at Merrylee followed the pattern of Glasgow's other post-war housing schemes with the erection of three & four storey blocks of flats.

Three storey blocks of flats at Merrylee

Three storey blocks of flats at Merrylee


Four storey blocks of flats at Merrylee

Four storey blocks of flats at Merrylee


St Gabriel's Roman Catholic church, Merrylee, was built in 1955 during the development of the housing scheme. It was designed by architect Thomas Smith Cordiner, who was the preferred architect of the Archdiocese at the time. This was a period when a lot of new housing developments were proceeding in outlying areas of the city as a consequence of slum clearance and Comprehensive Redevelopment of the old tenemental districts. Congregations were being displaced from the inner-city areas where the more traditional Catholic parishes were situated and new buildings were required for new parishes in the growing outer suburbs. There was a lot of private housing created in the 1950's in places like Simshill and Braehead, Cathcart.
In addition to St Gabriel's, Cordiner also designed the Church of Christ the King, King's Park and St Brigid's, Toryglen as well as St Margaret Mary's and St Bartholomew's in Castlemilk. His designs were generally quite simplistic, featuring brick exteriors which fitted in well with the surrounding new housing.

Front of St Gabriel's RC Church, Merrylee

Front of St Gabriel's RC Church, Merrylee


The view below shows St Gabriel's situated between a traditional sandstone villa of Newlands and a modernised terrace of Merrylee housing scheme.

Housing surrounding St Gabriel's RC Church, Merrylee

Housing surrounding St Gabriel's RC Church, Merrylee


Merrylea Holy Trinity Parish Church was designed by Peter Macgregor Chalmers, who was also the architect of St Margaret's Episcopal Church in Kilmarnock Road. The church opened in September 1915 with additions and alterations completed in 1922.

Sketch of Merrylea Parish Church with unbuilt tower

Sketch of Merrylea Parish Church with proposed tower which was never completed


Cutting from Glasgow Herald 15th September 1915 regarding opening of Merrylea Parish Church

Cutting from Glasgow Herald 15th September 1915 regarding opening of Merrylea Parish Church


Entrance to Merrylea Parish Church at base of unbuilt tower

Entrance to Merrylea Parish Church at base of unbuilt tower


View from the rear of Merrylea Parish Church

Internal view from the rear of Merrylea Parish Church


Pulpit at Merrylea Parish Church

Pulpit at Merrylea Parish Church


>Merrylea Parish Church from south-west

Merrylea Parish Church from south-west


Gable of Merrylea Church

Gable of Merrylea Parish Church


My personal connection to Newlands originated with my late mother, Nancy, who became a tram conductress based at Newlands Tram Depot after she arrived in Glasgow from County Cavan in Ireland in the early 1950's.

Nancy Blaikie on the left of Glasgow tram No.1297 at Rouken Glen terminus c.1950

Nancy Blaikie on the left of Glasgow tram No.1297 at Rouken Glen terminus c.1950

Glasgow tram No. 1297, shown above, was built in 1948 at Glasgow Corporation's workshops at Coplawhill. It was one of a class of tramcars which came to be known as "Cunarders". It remained in service until the tramway's last day of operation in September 1962, when it took part in the farewell parade. In July 1963 it was saved for preservation at the National Tramway Museum at Crich, Derbyshire. The old vehicle returned home for a spell carrying passengers at the Glasgow Garden Festival in 1988.

Our good friends, Jean and Dougie Watson, were totally unaware of my mother's connection with the Glasgow trams when they visited the National Tramway Museum in September 2019. While catching up with events shortly afterwards Jean surprised us with a picture on her smartphone of the very same tram featured above.

Jean Watson beside Glasgow tram No.1297 at Crich, Derbyshire, September 2019

Jean Watson beside Glasgow tram No.1297 at Crich, Derbyshire, September 2019


Newlands tram depot was developed from 1910 on the site of the Newlandsfield Bleachworks to the west of Kilmarnock Road. This large area of flat land is now the site of Morrison's supermarket.

Early 1960's view of redundant tramcar at Newlands Depot with replacemant buses in background

Early 1960's view of redundant tramcar at Newlands Depot with replacement buses in background


Cunarder tramcar at Newlands Depot

"Cunarder" tramcar at Newlands Depot


Tramcar at corner of Corrour Road and Kilmarnock Road, Newlands

Tramcar at corner of Corrour Road and Kilmarnock Road, Newlands, 1954


Rouken Glen bound tramcar in Kilmarnock Road, Newlands

Rouken Glen bound tramcar in Kilmarnock Road, Newlands


Giffnock bound tramcar at traffic lights in Kilmarnock Road, Newlands

Giffnock bound tramcar at traffic lights in Kilmarnock Road, Newlands



Dixon Halls, Crosshill

Gorbals

Pollokshields, Garden Suburb
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Govan
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Strathbungo & Crossmyloof
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Mount Florida
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Pollok Park & the Burrell
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Langside and Battlefield
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White Cart Walk, Pollok Park
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King's Park
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Rivers: Brock, Levern & Cart
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Castlemilk

Pollokshaws & Auldhouse
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Queen's Park Churches
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Shawlands & Pollokshaws Churches
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Muirend to Cathcart
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Old Cathcart
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Newlands & Merrylee
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White Cart Walk, Linn Park
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Cathcart Circle - A Railway Tour
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East Renfrewshire Suburbs
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 England, Ireland, USA
Architectural drawings -

All original artwork, photography and text © Gerald Blaikie
Unauthorised reproduction of any image on this website is not permitted.

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